These days, almost every aspect of business is driven by IT. Whether in terms of daily operations, client-facing services, or key specialty areas like cybersecurity and compliance, having a strong working knowledge of IT can be essential for contributing value to a company.

Organizations have certainly felt this shift. More so than ever before, businesses are having to make sure that all members of staff have specific IT knowledge and skills to be able to perform their roles. This even applies to non-technical departments such as Sales and Marketing, which are nonetheless supported by IT-powered services.

At the same time, more candidates are choosing to move into IT-focused careers. This area has seen a boom in growth over the last few decades that is not only speeding up but also diversifying with additional roles, opportunities, and areas of expertise. With the demand for qualified candidates growing all the time, pursuing or switching to a career in IT has never been more viable.

CompTIA is a global organization focused on advancing the IT industry by providing relevant and in-demand training for candidates at varying levels of experience. This includes newcomers to IT who are interested in developing the skills they need to get started in technology-driven job roles. 

Still, while CompTIA is certainly a huge name in the world of IT, that doesn’t mean CompTIA training should be taken at face value. This is especially true for anyone interested in funding their own training.

CompTIA offers a number of pre-career or entry-level certifications, but are these really beneficial for newcomers? Can IT newcomers learn the skills they need with CompTIA? 

Let’s take a look at whether CompTIA training is really valuable for beginners.

CompTIA For Beginners

One of the main selling points of CompTIA training is that there’s something for everyone. The certification path offers courses for candidates with varying skills, backgrounds, and levels of experience, including complete newcomers!

Indeed, for those who lack any foundational or working knowledge of IT, there are a number of viable options:

  • CompTIA IT Fundamentals (ITF+) – This qualification covers the base fundamentals for working in IT. Candidates learn the essentials of cybersecurity, networking, software, hardware, and so on. The syllabus also looks at some of the most commonly used apps in business and what they do, as well as best practices for connecting to the internet and working securely online.
  • CompTIA A+ – This qualification is intended for entry-level roles in technical support. The syllabus covers baseline security skills, troubleshooting and problem solving, operating system configuration, networking and infrastructure, data backup and recovery methods, and configuring and supporting hardware.
  • Network+ – This qualification teaches the foundational skills required in entry-level networking and infrastructure roles. The syllabus covers elements like configuring, troubleshooting, and managing networks. Unlike alternative courses, Network+ is program-agnostic. In other words, the skills can be applied more generally, helping candidates unlock a wider variety of roles.
  • Security+ – This qualification teaches baseline skills for performing security functions. It is an excellent choice for anyone considering a career in cybersecurity, especially via CompTIA’s more advanced security qualifications. Security+ also happens to be chosen by more defense organizations and corporations than any alternative on the market.

Why is CompTIA good for beginners?

There are a number of reasons to opt for CompTIA training as an IT newcomer. For one, CompTIA sets a world-leading standard for providing comprehensive and valuable insight. Its syllabuses are set by subject matter experts who work actively across the breadth of IT, giving them the insight to make the training as relevant as possible.

Not only that but the syllabuses themselves are updated regularly, so beginners can feel confident knowing their training will be highly relevant for the roles they are seeking. For example, A+ now covers how to facilitate setups for working from home, which has become the norm across IT. 

Another essential aspect of what makes CompTIA good for beginners is practicality. The courses do not simply offer slides and whitepapers for students to memorize. Instead, they typically combine information-centric training with lab work and performance-based exam questions. This not only teaches candidates how to apply their training but also verifies their ability to do so. This, in turn, makes it far easier for CompTIA practitioners to hit the ground running in their new roles.

It is also worth keeping in mind that the number of jobs in the global IT sector is increasing all the time. Even entry-level positions offer incentivizing salaries for candidates who can demonstrate their knowledge and ability. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Dice 2021 Tech Salary Report, entry-level positions like IT Support Specialist and Help Desk Technician have salaries averaging $50,000 to $55,000. 

Why Should Beginners Study CompTIA With Good e-Learning?

Good e-Learning is an award-winning online training provider with a diverse portfolio of fully accredited certification courses. Like CompTIA, we aim to provide professionals with the training they need to excel and to support them throughout their training journeys to help them succeed!

Our world-class support team offers expertise across each of our courses and aims to respond to any query in less than 24 hours. Candidates can also access our courses any time, anywhere, and from any web-enabled device, thanks to the free Go.Learn app. We also provide months of access to each candidate, making it easier for them to schedule training. All of this has made Good e-learning an excellent option for anyone interested in preparing for a career in IT while balancing other commitments.

Want to find out more? Visit the Good e-Learning website or contact a member of our team today!

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Philip is a content writer with experience across multiple industries, including gaming, home improvement, and now e-learning. He graduated from the London School of Economics with a BA in History before taking on various odd jobs and volunteer writing positions, but soon broke into professional writing as a retail journalist. Now focusing on content writing, Philip is a tireless enemy of cliched corporate jargon. He believes that marketing content should be clear, concise and relevant to readers. Rather than assuming that customers know all about your solution, it is up to you to identify with their problem and offer something that will really get their attention. As such, he strives to understand the real-world applications of Good e-Learning’s product portfolio so that it can be explained in a way that is both coherent and down to earth. If you cannot understand what you are selling, you won’t get far! In his spare time, Philip enjoys watching movies, gaming and writing with friends.